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Denver2018-08-04T15:48:48+00:00

Project Description

Settling in and connecting through slacklining

Slacklining can be a powerful tool to help refugees integrate into their new communities, build relationships, and learn the local language in a playful environment. And of course, slacklining can also help the local community to connect with refugees outside of headlines and news reports.

We’re working with the International Rescue Committee and the YMCA to teach slacklining to refugee youth and other neighborhood kids to facilitate friendships and help these kids learn all the things slacklining can teach like balance, focus, coordination, social skills, confidence, teamwork, trust, and determination.

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“Working with refugees has brought me a perspective so key in today’s world. In a time when human connection is tenuous, forging relationships through laughter, play, and comradery has never been more essential.”

MIKE PAYTON, AMERICAN, CROSSING LINES PROJECT COORDINATOR

WHY SLACKLINING?

CURRENT AND PAST PROJECTS

We run projects around the world

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LATEST ARTICLES

Together we make all the difference

Introducing Crossing Lines: Albuquerque

Crossing Lines is continuing to foster grassroots projects in more cities around the United States, this time in Albuquerque, New Mexico. We partnered up with the Refugee Well-being Project at the University of New Mexico during an outdoor version of their weekly 'Learning Circles', which integrate refugee families with locals of the Albuquerque community. At these gatherings, cultural exchange is abundant amidst play time, group activities, and one-on-one interaction.

  • Ali's Story featured image

Ali’s Story

We spent three years there, imprisoned by barbed wire and armed military who would rather take to violence than use their words. We slept in tents and small houses made of clay, living as best we could in our confinement.

  • Misunderstanding in the airport in Istanbul

Fear and Love in the Middle East

The moment my foot touched ground outside the train, I felt guilt, not relief. He knew. He knew I was scared of him. He knew why. And he knew he wasn’t a threat.

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CHANGE A LIFE TODAY

Without play, we are looking at a generation of lost children scarred by war, poverty, and violence, with many lacking education and stability. Help us teach refugee and other at-risk youth the confidence, creativity, and determination it will take to help them overcome the challenges ahead.

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